Udana Talks About Her Present…and Future, Pt. 7

NOTE: In this installment of their seven-part interview series, publicist Bill Murphy (BM) and multi-talented Udana Power (UP), discuss Udana’s life now…and her exciting plans for the future.

12241712_10206971079971278_306436462961486864_nBM: In our previous interviews we talked about your screenwriting, your commercials, your Broadway work, and your TV and movies. That brings us up to the present year, 2015. Tell me what are you doing now and what do you plan to do in the future? What’s next for Udana Power?

UP: Oh, my gosh. That’s a wonderful question because when I began to realize that we stand on everything we have already done that we stand on our past. We stand on our mistakes. We stand on our “approximations,” which is what I call “mistakes” now. There are no mistakes. We stand on the good and the bad and the wonderful things that have happened, and from there move into the next place because life is all about change. It’s all about blooming as. It’s not just random change. I believe that when we are accessing energy from our inner source like all the great religions say, it is blooming us. It’s inside of us. Enlightenment is inside of us. Everything we are looking for is inside of us, and we forget that at every sound, and so that inside of us is just what I call the Law of Blooming.

So right now I am working on a book about that, and I am also working on a book called, the Friendchise. There are two parts to this.

Number 1, it occurred to me, oh, about ten years ago. I saw it in a flash of inspiration. I thought, oh, my gosh, why does the law of attraction not always work? Why doesn’t it work for me all the time? Come on, what is this, God? Tell me. And because you know you plant a sunflower seed, and it’s not going to grow up and be an avocado tree. It’s just going to be a sunflower. It’s not even going to be a daisy. It’s still going to be just a sunflower. I was sprouting things for many years and eating living foods, and I would sprout mung beans and I would look at that little tail that comes out of a sprouting mung bean and go, “Wait a minute. Where does that tail come from?”

MungBeanI asked that question of audiences all the time. They always stop and consider and then someone says, “Uh, uh – inside the bean.” I always look back perplexed and say, “Well, it’s too big to be inside the bean.” And then nobody knows WHAT to say.

[Here’s a video of a mung bean sprouting that I think is fantastic.]

When I asked myself that question and seriously considered it, it made me realize that everything organic and alive and growing is an opening to Continue reading

“Ode to Valentine’s Day: Love First. Love Well. Love Often.”

NOTE: This is an article I wrote for Our Voices Magazine that I thought I’d share with you.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

“Ode to Valentine’s Day: Love First. Love Well. Love Often.”
By Udana Power

Men don’t like Valentine’s Day. Did you know that?

And many times Valentine’s Day turns out traumatic for women… kind of because men hate it, get really confused and feel guilty because they are not sure how to do it right. So then they don’t do Valentine’s Day at all – or if they get grumpy – which annoys the woman, it can add enough strain to make the whole thing go south, even if you are both pretending to celebrate Valentine’s Day with a proper dinner. Arg!

I took a whole series of seminars from an amazing woman who teaches women and men how to understand and be happy with each other. It was one of the first things I treated myself to when I started making some money. I had to figure this guy-thing out.

Amongst the series of weekend lectures that I was ultimately happy to spend a ton of money for, I was SHOCKED to learn two things. Literally knock-me-over-with-a-feather shocked. Actually, the whole room of women I was with gasped when the trainer told us what I’m about to tell you.

At the time she made her statement, there was a group of men standing on the stage in front of us sharing their points of view with the room. (I thought I was listening to a foreign language being explained.) When the trainer spoke this pressing truth, the audience of women gasped with incredulity and the men stared in surprise. The statement was so obvious to them that they were baffled why we were so shocked.

What does all this have to do with Valentine’s Day? Everything. You’ll see.

Here is an approximation of what she said: Girls, put down your pen and paper. Sit there because I want you to get this. I have interviewed men for Continue reading

Awaken Your Full Potential On Saturday, November 8th!

Hi Everyone,

If you like meditation you are going to love discovering Osho’s dynamic
meditations and spending a day in the Buddhafield. He called his ashram
a Buddhafield: A Community in which to provoke God.

Many of you are familiar with Osho through his inspiring quotes that are
being shared all over Facebook as well as the Internet.

I’ll be sharing about my journey with Osho as well as Detoxing the body
with Isagenix to facilitate total aliveness. Osho urged us to be as alive and
vibrant in our physical bodies as we are meditative — hence, he coined
the name “Zorba the Buddha.” He wanted us all to be Zorba the Buddhas -
fully alive, aware and loving.

Saturday, November 8th, is about awakening our full potential to celebrate
life and live healthy. Osho Niranjana Meditation Center is 40 miles north of
San Diego. All are welcome. We will include active meditations, some
transformative processes that changed my life completely when I went to
visit Osho in Poona and in Rajneeshpuram as well as enjoying the healthiest
food on the planet.

Come spend a remarkable day with us. If you don’t live nearby but have
friends who do, you are welcome to forward this flyer to them.

See you there!

- Udana

Udana Talks About Her TV and Movie Career, Pt. 4

In this interview (which was conducted late Summer/early Fall, 2014), Bill Murphy (BM) focuses on Udana Power’s (UP) career in commercials (print and television), as well as her appearances on stage. Thank you, Udana, for your time – and for providing all of the photos.

BM: Tell me about General Hospital. What was it like getting that gig? What were your impressions of being in it? What did you like about it? What did you not like about it?

Udana-1980sUP: I loved it because it was a steady job. And I got to be acting for a living. At that time, daytime TV was not as hip as it is now. Even so, that was about the time that some stars were springing out of daytime TV to go further in their careers, to become major careers. We were heading into a strike, and to have a semi-recurring in anything was wonderful. I got to work regularly. I would show up a couple of times a week for General Hospital. I played a character named Fran Woods…and in every script they had her breaking down sobbing. I looked at the scripts and said, “Oh my God! I have to do that every day I’m there!”

BM: [laughs]

UP: [laughs] Jeez, you can’t fake that. I have to prime myself so that I really break down sobbing.

BM: Your character looked like she was constantly emotionally on edge. What was going on at the time? What was that plot about?

GeneralHospitalUP: My husband or my lover, the man I was living with had disappeared, and we figured the Mob had killed him. They found his watch and one of his shoes in the river. And I was like a really nice ’50s housewife who never asked any questions, and I’d never met any of his friends. It was kind of like an alcoholic marriage, the very strange, dysfunctional marriage where I just stayed home and raised the kids. I didn’t know where the money came from, I didn’t know anything about his friends. He was a traveling salesman and did something with restaurant supplies. So all of a sudden he didn’t show up, and then I go to Anna to start investigating it and find out where could he be. Anna says, “Oh my gosh, they found this. Do you recognize this watch?” It was a watch I’d given him for Christmas. So I break down in tears and sob, “Oh my God, he’s dead, he’s dead.” Then they find his shoe. And then somebody’s sending me money, and then they’re starting to cut down sending me money, so there’s all this trauma going on. And I have children to support.

Screen Shot 2014-09-22 at 8.35.54 PMI actually don’t remember much more of it. What I do remember is having to break down and sob almost every show, because it said in the script, “She breaks down and sobs.” So I was kind of on edge. And you can’t make that stuff up – you have to really go there. It was…I think the word could be “turgid.” [laughs]

I would come in early to prepare, learn all my lines, make sure I knew where to stand and didn’t bump into the furniture. I would record everyone else’s lines on a tape recorder while leaving room for my own lines and go over it again, and again, and again, and again, because that way I could have the cue in my ear – I could hear it, I could feel it, and bounce back with the line. It would start becoming automatic. It wasn’t just reading it on the page and then hoping I’d hit the cue when the actor threw it at me. I didn’t have someone to rehearse my lines with, so I had this little cassette tape recorder… Do you believe it? Today I’d be using my iPhone. I would just put everybody else’s lines on it, with room enough for mine, and stay in character as I practiced. That’s how I learned my lines for daily shows. So when I got on the set with these really emotional scenes, Continue reading

“Love is the only thing that can change the world” – Udana Power

UdanaPowerOn March 6, 2013, Udana Power spoke to The Only Love Project, an organization committed to inter-faith, inter-spiritual bridge building.

The Only Love Project is based on the premise that “only love dispels hate,” and it is open to all who desire to change the world for the better, one community at a time.

Bill Murphy (BM): Could you tell us, briefly, a little bit about your background?

Udana Power (UP): Well, I’ve always wanted to know God. I don’t know where it came from, but I had to know. And I wanted to know. I mean, I was journaling about it when I was 11 and 12 years old. Sometimes I would just journal all night. I wanted to be also an actress. I was compelled to be, don’t know why. And I would write Love and God and Art and Nature and Sex – all those words started with capital letters.  Because somehow all that was part of my searching.

I don’t know what it was. It was core. Now I call it the Law of Blooming, being connected to our source. But at that time, I didn’t know what it was. I was just vaguely trying to find it.

So, my desire to be an actress was for many reasons.  I had a gift for it, but I had to know the Source. When I was acting, or when I ultimately started singing, I would reconnect to the Source place within me, and let that flow of energy sing through me. I would line it all up, and it would take over and flow.  I remember when I was flown to New York by Alan Jay Lerner and auditioned in front of the producers of Coco, starring Katharine Hepburn.  It was in her only stage CocoPlaybillmusical. Alan and I walked into the big lobby of the Mark Hellenger Theater one afternoon.  It was empty. It felt like I was walking into my own dream. I remember Alan was holding my hand. I was very young and very naïve at the time, and I felt like I was walking into a cathedral. As we crossed the lobby and walked I into the great, big, empty theatre, there were a few men in suits there. One of them was Andre Previn.  Everyone introduced themselves and then they asked me to go up on stage and sing.

It was a long walk. All I knew was this is where life was created. All I could think of was that and my personal relationship with God.  I walked up to the big empty stage and sang “Greensleeves” in French and “God Bless The Child.”  Alan said later that it was like they were watching a young Judy Garland.

And whenever I’ve been to a theatrical performance that’s truly wonderful there is something of the spiritual in it. So, that’s been my life, and that’s where I came from. I was an actress in theatre for many years, I was on television and film, I did a one-woman show for five years. And when I did my work, I called it a Yahweh. That’s a word for God. I couldn’t quite articulate what it was, but if I could fling myself out into that experience, and channel that. Then I was doing what I was put here to do.

And I did that many times over and over. People would come backstage just sobbing because the performance had such a profound effect on them. It wasn’t me – it was something that I flung myself into that came through me.  For me it was interesting, and it was easy.

I remember the producer for Applause at the San Bernardino Civic Light Opera. Larry Kasha had produced it on Broadway and was directing it here. I played Eve opposite Yvonne De Carlo. The producer was a woman who Continue reading